AATSP/SANTILLANA USA WEBINARS – SESSION 2: Teaching Vocabulary In The Spanish Classroom

AATSP/SANTILLANA USA WEBINARS (JANUARY, 2012)

WEBINAR SESSION 2:

HABLANDO BIEN SE ENTIENDE LA GENTE: LA ENSEÑANZA DEL LÉXICO EN EL AULA DE ESPAÑOL (TEACHING VOCABULARY IN THE SPANISH CLASSROOM)

Session Summary (in English):

Current research shows that vocabulary acquisition is the single biggest predictor of language, literacy and academic success. Therefore, teaching and learning effective vocabulary strategies help Spanish language learners attain both communicative proficiency and literacy in Spanish.

The Spanish language is varied, complex and rich in vocabulary. Spanish educators need to focus on teaching language registers that can be understood, and that assist Spanish students in attaining communicative proficiency. This workshop will review scientifically based vocabulary teaching concepts. Based on these concepts, we will offer suggestions for classroom pedagogical strategies. We will also discuss the book “Hablando bien se entiende la gente” by Gerardo Piña Rosales, President of the North American Academy of the Spanish Language, et al., in which common errors of Spanish vocabulary use and how to correct them are presented in a fun and engaging manner.

Session Summary (in Spanish):

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The Spanish Language of the United States

Gerardo Piña-Rosales, The North American Academy of Spanish Language

First of all, dear reader, let us focus on the title of this essay: "The Spanish Language of the United States" instead of "The Spanish Language in the United States." The difference between these two propositions is an essential one: it implies that we have begun to speak of a United Stated Spanish with its own characteristics, as one more of the multiple variants of the Spanish language spoken around the world.

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Motivation

Jan Kucerik, Pinellas County Public Schools, Pinellas County, Florida

A 7th grade student known to his Spanish teacher as "Juanito" ambles reluctantly into his beginning Spanish classroom. He greets the teacher, not with an enthusiastic "Buenos días, señora," but instead with the question on the mind of many of his classmates, "What are we doing in here today?" Although we would like to believe that the question has been posed out of genuine interest in the classroom activities, we realize that Juanito's question is motivated by self-preservation. He worries that he might be unprepared for, or embarrassed by, the activities Señora has planned for today.

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